Mark Twain
Mark Twain is an American writer. Born November 30, 1835 in the village of Florida (pc. Missouri). He spent his childhood in the town of Hannibal on the Mississippi. He…

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Robert Silverberg
Robert Silverberg (born Robert Silverberg, born January 15, 1935, Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a prolific American author best known for his science fiction works, which received the Hugo and…

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Kenneth MacLeod
Kenneth MacLeod (MacLeod, Kenneth Macrae) one of the brightest English authors of recent times writing in the genre of "solid" science fiction with elements of utopian and socialist satire. Born…

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China Mieuville

China Mieuville (full name – China Tom Miéville) is a British science fiction writer who defines his genre as “weird fiction”.

Born in 1972 in London in a family of hippie parents. To them, among other things, he owes his strange name (“China” – “China” (Eng.)) And communication in childhood with friends with no less strange names – Cascade and India.

China Mieville loved to read from childhood, but, according to him, was not an active fan and did not know anything about fan conventions. However, he carefully studied many science fiction magazines such as Interzone, as well as the science fiction column in White Dwarf. A lot of books he read back in his school years inspired his first works of his own, and despite the fact that most of the writing was rejected by publishers, his story Highway Sixty One Revisited and the poem Ex-Beatles in Seance by Steve were published in 1985 Bailey. ”

From early childhood, China lived in London, studied at a boarding school. When he was eighteen, he worked for a year in Egypt and Zimbabwe, where he taught English. Since then, he has remained interested in Arab culture and Middle Eastern politics. Returning to his homeland, Mieuville received a bachelor’s degree in social anthropology at Cambridge University, and then graduated with honors from the London School of Economics and received his doctorate (PhD) in international relations: he defended his doctoral dissertation entitled “In the Clash of Two Equal Rights”, in which adapted the Marxist concept of law to the theory of international law, relying on the work of Eugene Pashukanis and critical theoreticians of law, and demonstrated the connection of international law with imper -Realism. He then received a Frank Knox scholarship at Harvard University.

Mieuville is a Trotskyist, a former member of the British Socialist Workers Party. In 2001, he ran for the House of Commons from the Socialist Alliance, gaining 459 votes, that is 1.2%. In January 2013, he criticized the management of the PSA. In March 2013, he left the party due to disagreement with the leadership’s refusal to convict the perpetrator of the intra-party sexual scandal. His left-wing political views are reflected in his works (including his novel The Iron Council) and theoretical views on literature (his criticism of The Lord of the Rings). Member of the editorial board of the Marxist journal “Historical Materialism” (Netherlands).

Mieville’s debut novel, The Rat King, was released in 1998 and was nominated for the Bram Stoker Prize, the International Horror Guild Award, and the Locus Poll Award, but received no prizes. Rather than a horror in form than a fantasy, it nevertheless appeared quite indicative in terms of the exact manner in which the writer prefers to work. Subsequently, Mieville turned to the genre of fantasy steam punk. In the work of the author there are elements of science fiction, fantasy and horror literature. The last of the listed genres includes most of Mieville’s stories, which have repeatedly appeared in the prestigious collections of Fantasy, Mystery, Magical Realism: The Best of the Year, Horror: The Best of the Year, and thematic anthologies. The author himself admitted that some influence on his little prose had the work of Howard Lovecraft.

The second book, “Station of Lost Dreams,” which was published two years after the first, fully demonstrated Mieville’s skill in the genre that he finally chose. In it, the reader will see the metropolis of New Crobuson, imbued with the almost steampunk spirit of the 19th century, where along with cyborgs and A.I., science and magic, many carefully drawn races coexist – people, winged garudas, mutants and half-breeds. The novel received several awards: in 2001 – the Arthur C. Clark Prize, the British Fantasy Prize (novel – The August Derllet Prize); in 200 – Kurd Lasswitz Award and Ignotus Award, and was also nominated for the Hugo, Nebula Award. Other nominations for this novel include the 2001 World Fantasy Award, the British Science Fiction Award-2000, Locus 2001 (4th) and the James Tiptree Jr. 2000 Award.

The writer claims that he works by deliberately mixing genres – horror, fantasy and science fiction – while creating works that are called “weird fiction”. Mieville belongs to a free group of authors who are called “New Weird” and who are trying to save fantasy “from the grip of commerce and genre clichés of Tolkien’s epigones.” In an interview with Locus Magazine, he says: “The idea of ​​a comforting fantasy makes me gag. It’s not that you shouldn’t feel comfortable, or there shouldn’t be any happy endings, but for me the idea that the task of the book is to console, essentially means that its purpose is not to challenge, not to subvert, not to expose to doubt. Then it is entirely oriented towards the status quo – completely, firmly, aesthetically – and I hate this idea.

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